Tennyson poem crossing the bar. Crossing the Bar by Alfred Lord Tennyson 2022-10-12

Tennyson poem crossing the bar Rating: 8,4/10 988 reviews

Alfred, Lord Tennyson's poem "Crossing the Bar" is a beautiful and poignant meditation on death and the unknown. In just four stanzas, Tennyson masterfully captures the fear, uncertainty, and acceptance that often accompany the thought of passing from this life to the next.

The first stanza of the poem sets the scene, with the speaker standing on the shore, gazing out at the "turbid ebb and flow" of the sea. This imagery suggests the tumultuous and unpredictable nature of life, as well as the speaker's own sense of being tossed about by the currents of fate. Despite the turmoil around him, however, the speaker remains calm and resigned, telling himself that "there is a better shore, thou canst not see." This phrase suggests that the speaker has faith in a higher power or a better place beyond the reach of mortal eyes, a belief that helps him to find peace in the face of death.

The second stanza of the poem shifts to a more personal tone, as the speaker reflects on his own journey and the many "finely worded songs" he has written over the years. The phrase "finely worded songs" suggests the speaker's love of language and his skill as a poet, and the mention of his own work serves to remind the reader of Tennyson's own reputation as one of the greatest Victorian poets. At the same time, however, the speaker seems to acknowledge that his words, no matter how finely crafted, are ultimately limited and fleeting. "I think that I shall never see / A poem lovely as a tree," he says, implying that the natural world and the mysteries it embodies are far beyond the reach of human understanding.

In the third stanza, the speaker turns his attention to the present moment, describing the "dew-drenched pasture" and the "long, green grass" that surrounds him. These images of nature serve as a reminder of the speaker's own mortality, as he contemplates the fact that he will soon be lying "dead" in the grass himself. Despite this, however, the speaker remains resigned and accepting, telling himself that "love and sleep" will soon claim him, suggesting that death may not be so frightening after all.

The final stanza of the poem brings the speaker's thoughts full circle, returning to the image of the sea that opened the poem. The speaker now describes the sea as a "gracious" and "infinite" force, one that is able to "swell, but not to shrink." This imagery suggests the enduring power and majesty of the natural world, as well as the speaker's own sense of connection to it. As the speaker prepares to "cross the bar" and pass from this life to the next, he finds solace in the thought that he will be reunited with the eternal forces of nature and the divine.

In conclusion, "Crossing the Bar" is a poignant and beautifully crafted meditation on death and the unknown. Through his use of imagery, language, and structure, Tennyson masterfully captures the fear, uncertainty, and acceptance that often accompany the thought of passing from this life to the next, offering a message of hope and comfort to readers of all ages.

Cambridge Authors » Practical Criticism: Tennyson’s ‘Crossing the Bar’

tennyson poem crossing the bar

But such discourse is disingenuous in case like this, where the author could only have allowed one interpretation of that final stanza. If you do want it read, better to give them a copy each to read to themselves or take home with them. Supporting details in a text can help lead a reader to the main idea. Secondly, in considering how the poet has constructed the 'bar' between life and death, we must look at the specifics of his language. For instance, the tiger in the poem longs to be in the jungle and he looks longingly at the shining stars in the sky. He cannot assure that there will be 'no sadness of farewell', so he cannot solidify the matter within the poem itself.

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Crossing the Bar / Tennyson

tennyson poem crossing the bar

It is so obvious a message from her about how she wanted to be remembered and I am grateful that my family and I gave her the kind of remembrance that is spoken of in these lines of Tennyson My father quoted the first verse very difficultly while sick in the hospital in September. He takes the traditional, religious image and symbol of the journey of the soul from, and to, its real home, that is, heaven, and makes it the central metaphor in this poem. How does Crossing the Bar convey the philosophy of Tennyson? The first and third lines of each stanza are always a couple of beats longer than the second and fourth lines, although the line lengths vary among the stanzas. Sunset and evening star And one clear call for me! A sandbar is a kind of barrier between the river water and the sea. He wants to cross the bar in order to continue his journey before he reaches his destination and meets his maker — God.

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Tennyson’s Poetry “Crossing the Bar” Summary & Analysis

tennyson poem crossing the bar

Third: he asked future editors to place it last in collections of his work. The family knew the symbolic meaning of the poem, and even though the actual crossing had been untimely and not like a "tide as. Twilight and evening bell, And after that the dark! Leave a Reply Name email address will not be published Website Δ. He hopes that the ocean will not make the mournful sound of waves beating against a sand bar when he sets out to sea. In essence, it is a poem that argues that death is in fact a kind of comfort, a point of view based on the speaker's religious faith in the afterlife. By looking at the stars, the tiger hope to be with nature some day. There are other hymns that echo that thought.

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Crossing The Bar by Alfred Tennyson

tennyson poem crossing the bar

The theme differs from the main idea because the main idea describes what the text is mostly about. It's often used at memorkal services. The waves and wind blow over the bar and sounds of moaning come from it. When I asked him if he was scared of dying, he said, "dying isn't scary, living is scary". Your analysis intrigues me because while the purpose of your essay is to encourage questioning, I wonder that in questioning you have missed the obvious. Summary The speaker heralds the setting of the sun and the rise of the evening star, and hears that he is being called. The precise implications of this word might be worth considering.

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Alfred Lord Tennyson

tennyson poem crossing the bar

You cannot instruct people not to be sad when you die and then write such a sad poem which may or may not be read aloud. And may there be no moaning of the bar, When I put out to sea, But such a tide as moving seems asleep, Too full for sound and foam, When that which drew from out the boundless deep Turns again home. . A composite might read…. Twilight and evening bell, And after that the dark! Rather, he wishes for a tide that is so full that it cannot contain sound or foam and therefore seems asleep when all that has been carried from the boundless depths of the ocean returns back out to the depths. Perhaps you know this and want to see how the public will respond. What is the message of Crossing the Bar? As you rightly point out, Tennyson is speaking of his own demise.

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How does Tennyson's poem "Crossing the Bar" exhort us to accept death calmly?

tennyson poem crossing the bar

The poem can be seen as a reflection on the universal human experience of mortality and the unknown nature of what lies beyond this life. When the narrator dies, he sees it as a natural occurrence, and so he hopes that his farewell from life will not be sad. The rest of the content of the song is different from Tennyson. Further Thinking How if at all might the following facts affect the way you read the poem? More recent choral settings include those by M. The construction of this metaphor centres on the image of 'crossing the bar'; a 'bar' is physically a bar of sand in shallow water. We can contrast this to the use of indefinite phrases in the poem: 'And may there be no moaning of the bar' 'And may there be no sadness of farewell' 'I hope to see my Pilot face to face' Tennyson makes a clear distinction between events which he knows will happen, and events which he hopes will happen.

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Crossing the Bar Poem Summary and Analysis

tennyson poem crossing the bar

Twilight and evening bell, And after that the dark! What does Tennyson mean by the moaning of the bar? The face to face meeting is the point of the poem, coming as it does in the final stanza: the final destination expected when telling of any journey. This is an effort to mold the past to suit our wishes, and is, at best, self-deceit. What is the meaning of May there be no moaning? Twilight and evening bell, And after that the dark! These sounds denote that there is not enough water to sail over the bar. And they came quickly: the poem appears to have been composed in one sitting. .

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Why did Tennyson write crossing the bar?

tennyson poem crossing the bar

How is Crossing the Bar a poem of faith? This is one of many poems that my father used to recite to me when I was a child. As he grew more ill and his death was near he loved this even more. And may there be no sadness of farewell, When I embark; For tho' from out our bourne of Time and Place The flood may bear me far, I hope to see my Pilot face to face When I have crost the bar. . I am totally new to it and absolutely fascinated by your analyses of it, also by the many composers who have set it to music, ranging from classical to mid-west folk.

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