Binsey poplars. Structure and poetic devices in Hopkin's Binsey Poplars (WAEC 2021 2022-11-06

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The concept of the ninth level of hell, also known as the frozen lake of Cocytus, is found in Dante Alighieri's epic poem "The Divine Comedy." In this work, Dante describes a journey through the nine circles of hell, with each circle representing a different level of sin and punishment. The ninth circle, also known as the frozen lake of Cocytus, is reserved for those who have committed the most heinous crimes, including treachery and betrayal.

According to Dante's description, the frozen lake of Cocytus is a frozen wasteland, where the damned are punished by being frozen in ice up to their necks. The sinners in this circle are divided into four rings, each representing a different type of betrayal. The first ring is reserved for those who betrayed their country, the second for those who betrayed their guests or benefactors, the third for those who betrayed their kin, and the fourth for those who betrayed their friends and loved ones.

One of the most famous examples of a sinner punished in the frozen lake of Cocytus is Judas Iscariot, who betrayed Jesus Christ and is considered one of the most infamous traitors in history. According to Dante's depiction, Judas is frozen in ice up to his neck, with his head bent down towards his chest in eternal shame and remorse.

The frozen lake of Cocytus represents the ultimate punishment for those who have committed the most heinous sins, and serves as a warning to all those who might consider betraying the ones they love or their own principles. It is a place of darkness and cold, where the souls of the damned are condemned to an eternity of suffering and regret.

A Short Analysis of Hopkins’s ‘Binsey Poplars’

binsey poplars

He comments thus: Not spared, notone That dandled a sandalled Shadow that swam or sank On meadow and river and wind wandering weed winding bank Stanza Two The poet seems to say that humans have acted in ignorance of the mistake they have made by cutting down trees generally: O if we but knew what we do when we delve or how hack and rack the growing green Doing such thing as cutting down the trees in the environment is compared by the poet to destroying the country herself: Since country is so tender To touch, her being so slender. Another, though, is that this poem is just so darn…sad. Fire Hopkins uses images of fire to symbolize the passion behind religious feeling, as well as to symbolize God and Christ. Without any doubt, he loved those trees, but more than he understood that those trees were just one small part of Nature that the world will never get back. Mood: The mood of the poem is that of grief, sadness, anger, and finally wistfulnessthat this quietly glorious sight will never be available to future generations. This poem was written during the 19th century, at a time when the English society was undergoing multiple transformations which revolved around religion, ideology, urbanization and migration, to mention but a few.

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Binsey Poplars Poem Summary and Analysis

binsey poplars

Since country is so tender To touch, her being so slender, That, like this sleek and seeing ball But a prick will make no eye at all, Where we, even where we mean To mend her we end her, When we hew or delve: After-comers cannot guess the beauty been. If you find this article helpful subscribe to get daily posts and updates. In the increase of civilization and technology, the simple things that the poplar helps with are forgotten and underestimated. The poem is really just a dispatch from a place where beauty has been lost, Nature has been spoiled, and some old friends have been permanently taken away. Setting And Arrangement of the StanzasA setting or backdrop is the time and geographic location within a narrative, either non-fiction or fiction.

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Binsey Poplars Analysis

binsey poplars

The setting initiates the main backdrop and mood for a story. They allow the reader to visualize of damage done to the environment through the complete annihilation of all the trees that once lined both sides of the river. He recollects the environmental value of the trees - the trees whose leaves usually provided shade against the harsh effect of the sun: aspens dear, whose airy cages quelled. Their freshly beautiful appearance and line arrangement just almost like a military parade or procession makes them remarkable and this brings joy to the poet each time he sights them. It is true that budding roads, amusement parks and the likes are all hallmarks of progress, but it is at the expense of Nature, At the end of the day, generations yet unborn might not be able to enjoy the beauty of Nature, For instance, in Africa, in this contemporary period, generations of young Africans ate not familiar and cannot appreciate, in a meaningful way, discussions about herbs.

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Study Guide to Binsey Poplars

binsey poplars

What does this line mean? Ten or twelve, only ten or twelve Strokes of havoc únselve The sweet especial scene, Rural scene, a rural scene, Sweet especial rural scene. He sees a bigger problem in them being cut down. However, humans are not only the agent of destruction, but the object of it as well. Hopkins was saddened by this development. The first stanza is written with the eye of an artist as Hopkins describes not only the trees themselves but also the negative space created by their branches, quelling and quenching the sun, which appears to leap as its angle changes and the leaves move.

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Binsey Poplars

binsey poplars

Contemporary realities can attest to this with the changes in seasonal orderliness and ecological incidents arising out of the effects of excessive carbon on the ozone layer. M Hopkins was born on July, 28, 1844 in Stratford, Sessex, England. Specifically, human interference in natural world effectively stops Nature from being, well, natural. Appeal is made to imagery and symbolism to enhance poetic effect in the presentation of the theme of the poem. He considers this an act of needless destruction and environmental vandalism.

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Poem: Critical Analysis of 'Binsey Poplars'

binsey poplars

The second date is today's date — the date you are citing the material. Lines 20 — 25. The words are listed in the order in which they appear in the poem. Hopkins emphasizes that it takes so little to irreparably alter nature; just ten or twelve strokes create a landscape that is unrecognizable and make the original pristine state unimaginable to those who come after. Like much of Hopkins's poetry, "Binsey Poplars" wasn't published until years after his death: it first appeared in the posthumous collection Poems 1918. It has led to a better understanding of the world with increased communication, education and travel amongst different people of the world.

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Gerard Manley Hopkins

binsey poplars

It is while reading the poem that one gets enlightened to the fact that the poem is talking about trees. The rhyme scheme is abacbacceefgghhfgifiifff. This use of inversion and verse-like structure foregrounds this poem as poetry. One might think it to be the name of a band, mistake it for an Irish saying or imagine it as a name used to qualify a set of people during the Victorian age. Discuss the forms and meter of the poem; D. Such an introduction to the poem makes it melancholic.

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Binsey Poplars by Gerard Manley Hopkins

binsey poplars

The last five lines of the poem appeals to the gentility and beauty of village scene. The reduction of rural landscapes is also one of these effects. He laments the loss of these trees because all of them have been cut and not one is left behind. The poet lived and worked near there, so he knew the setting and its natural features, as one day the disappearance of a familiar stand of Polars trees got him worried and disturbed to the extent of him writing this poem. At first, it seems to be the loss of some trees, specifically, poplars. Structure of The Poem Binsey Poplars Binsey Poplar is a lyric poem of twenty-four lines and two stanzas. When an eyeball is pricked, it immediately deflates and no more exists.


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Summary Analysis of Binsey Polars By Gerald Manley Hopkins for WAEC, NECO, GCE, JAMB.

binsey poplars

Many traditional verse forms prescribe a specific verse metre, or a certain set of metres alternating in a particular order. The analogy made is that just like a little piercing eye could lead to one having no eye at all, that is also the case with the earth and with Nature. Cite this page as follows: "Binsey Poplars - The Poem" Critical Guide to Poetry for Students Ed. Hence no part of these reference materials should be lifted from this blog without due credence. This micro-setting which is the most immediate setting, is the village of Binsey in Oxfordshire, England.

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